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how to be an idea chaser: 7 girlboss skills to practice

I have a sort of obsession with idea-chasers (aka cool people who do cool things). I follow all kinds of bloggers, photographers, and writers on Instagram and drool over their lives. I watch vlogs of young, creative entrepreneur-types trying to make it in NYC while I do my makeup in the morning. I spend sleepy Sunday afternoons researching (read: stalking) the creative, independant go-getters of today, and wondering 'how the heck did they get to where they are?" What are the steps? How do you get from "trying" to "success?"

Who knows.

I'm not an expert here, unfortunately. I'm still in the 'trying' phase. But once I come up with a concise list of guaranteed steps towards becoming a successful go-getter, I'll be sure to write a kick butt blog post about it.

Until then, I do have some ideas about skills that I think are important to practice in order to be a girl who works for herself and creates stuff and runs her own life. These are things I've definitely been trying to do over the past year (and to some extent, have done).


A realistic strategy to optimize your free time

Whenever I have free time, whether it's a two-week vacation or just a free Sunday, I whip out my mental list of twenty-seven backlogged things I want to learn and do. It's about time I read every single page of those photography books, isn't it? And what about actually learning to knit well? And I want to learn to code at some point. And I need to do a bunch of blog planning and writing.

But here's the thing: I'm a busy girl. I'm used to having no free time. I'm used to having to cram 3 hours of studying into two hours, staying up far too late, surviving in a constant state of slightly-rushed-ness. I'm tired. So when I do get a vacation day? This is how it ends up going:

Collapse onto couch. With laptop. And snack. 

Move as little as possible. 

This does not bode will for my big aspirations. And since I do have so many things I want to, I always get frustrated with myself for not doing them all. Even if I do some of them (a reasonable amount!) I still feel like time is being wasted. For example, I just came back from spring break, and I didn't do everything that I wanted to do. I did some picture taking and some reading and some fun things. But I also did quite a lot of nothing. Why does that make me so mad?


An Artsy February Round-up

So February happened fast, amirite?

It was a small-but-mighty month for me. A lot of stuff happened in a quick amount of time. And not just because I was lucky, but also because I made stuff happen. In short, February was a month of being a #girlboss.

Stop telling women to smile || thought of the day

"Sometimes you look so unimpressed," a boy from my high school said. "Like it's kinda scary. You should smile more."

Have you ever been told to smile, or told that you're too serious? From 'bitch face' jokes to catcalls to friendly, well-meaning professors who tell you "you're too serious! I want to see your smile!" this is just another expectation of how we've got to behave. Is it a crime that I'm not happy all the time? Is it a crime that sometimes my face muscles just want to relax? Is it a crime that I don't always fake-laugh at some guy's totally un-funny joke? I know people are somewhat kidding when they say these things (and they say them a lot), but even if it is a joke, the nature of the joke is kind of annoying to me. So I'm going to use this blog post opportunity to explain why.

It discourages people from being honest about their feelings

Here's the truth: nobody's happy all the time. Not men, not women, not anybody. So reinforcing the idea that we always need to be cheerful and pleasant and 100% welcoming also reinforces fake-ness. It's the thing that makes us say "I'm good, how are you?" when we're really not good. It's what causes us to guard our bad feelings from our loved ones. Because in a world that views 'happiness' as the ultimate goal, not being happy feels like it's own type of failure. When we feel like we need to constantly be smiling, it stops us from being honest and open about the other, not-so-happy emotions.